While pure copper and aluminum provide excellent heat conductivity, they tend to be rather reactive and suffer from surface corrosion. While this surface corrosion is a purely cosmetic problem, Cooler Master is well aware of the importance of product appearance. We provide several surface treatments to prevent surface corrosion and maintain smooth, shiny and clean looking metal surfaces.

Anti-Corrosion finish (Before and After)


The first step is removing the thin surface layer of corroded metal and traces of other materials. The Heatsink is then chemically oxidated which produces an even, clear protective layer. It isolates the metal from oxygen and other corrosive gases in the air.

Anti-oxidation treatment process flow diagram




Deburring Treatment (Before and After)

The first step is removing the thin surface layer of corroded metal and traces of other materials. The Heatsink is then surface treated with either a matt or glossy finish

Deburring Treatment process flow diagram

Anodizing (in different colors)


Aluminum not only corrodes quickly, it features a rather soft surface that gets scratched and deformed easily. Anodizing through electro chemical coversion not only improves corrosion resistance but increases the metals surface strength, and can be dyed in various colors.

The first step is removing the thin surface layer of corroded metal and traces of other materials. The Heatsink is then submerged in a bath and electrically charged to create a 2 to 75 micro meter thin layer of anozided metal, resulting in improved light resistance, heat resistance, corrosion resistance and wear resistance. This oxide layer can be made in different colors depending on the post chemistries that are employed. The anodized parts are quite durable and do not tarnish and maintain their cosmetic appearance for a long period of time.

Anodizing Drying



Anodizing process flow diagram


Powder Coating


Powder Coating is an advanced yet simple way of spray-painting a fine, dry plastic powder paint onto a metal surface. As the powder paint cloud gently leaves the front of the spray gun, it is charged with static electricity. The charge attracts the powder paint to the part that requires coating. The part is then placed in an oven, where it bakes at high temperature for a few minutes.

While in the oven, the powder paint melts and flows into a durable finish. Powder coatings have been shown to possess significant durability and resistance to abrasion, corrosion, scratching, and chemicals when compared to liquid coatings. As far as texture selections are concerned, powder coatings range from smooth surfaces to wrinkled or matte finishes.



Powder coating process flow diagram